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Wednesday, May 6, 2020 | History

2 edition of Assessing consumer preferences in the management of abnormal cervical smears found in the catalog.

Assessing consumer preferences in the management of abnormal cervical smears

Patricia Meldrum

Assessing consumer preferences in the management of abnormal cervical smears

a pilot study

by Patricia Meldrum

  • 124 Want to read
  • 36 Currently reading

Published by Health Economics Research Unit, University of Aberdeen in Aberdeen .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Statementby Patricia Meldrum and Katherine Johnston.
SeriesDiscussion paper / Health Economics Research Unit -- no.10/92
ContributionsJohnston, Katharine., University of Aberdeen. Health Economics Research Unit.
The Physical Object
Pagination28p. ;
Number of Pages28
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL21094113M

Monsonego J, Bosch FX, Coursaget P, et al. Cervical cancer control, priorities and new directions. Int J Cancer ;– Buntinx F, Brouwers M. Relation between sampling device and detection of abnormality in cervical smears: A meta-analysis of randomised and quasi-randomised studies. BMJ ;()– For the follow-up of abnormal cervical cytology results, the Family Planning and Reproductive Health Program requires that delegate agencies follow the American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology’s (ASCCP) Updated Consensus Guidelines for the Management of Abnormal Cervical Cancer Screening Tests and Cancer Size: 74KB.

Approximately 15% of women in the NHS Cervical Screening Programme will have a smear that is reported as not being normal, of whom will be referred for colposcopy each year. In addition to the colposcopic findings, assessment should include the clinical context and, in Author: C.W.E Redman, R Todd. The Pap smear results were significantly related to marriage age, habits (smoker or not), living address, number of parities, age of first pregnancy, symptoms, cervical appearance, and colposcopy.

  Receipt of an abnormal cervical smear result often generates fear and confusion and can have a negative impact on a woman's well-being. Most previous studies have focussed on high-grade abnormal Cited by: Cervical abnormalities. A smear test or cervical screening test is used to detect pre-cancerous cells in your cervix (the entrance to your womb). Regular screening monitors changes in the cells. An abnormal smear result could indicate changes have occurred. About 1 in 20 tests show mild cell changes.


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Assessing consumer preferences in the management of abnormal cervical smears by Patricia Meldrum Download PDF EPUB FB2

The chapter covers cervical cytology, and the management and follow-up of abnormal smears. Access to the complete content on Oxford Medicine Online requires a subscription or purchase.

Public users are able to search the site and view the abstracts for each book and chapter without a subscription.

Full text Full text is available as a scanned copy of the original print version. Get a printable copy (PDF file) of the complete article (K), or. Buy Assessing consumer preferences in the management of abnormal cervical smears - a pilot study by Patricia Meldrum, Katherine Johnston (ISBN:) from Amazon's Book Store.

Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible : Patricia Meldrum, Katherine Johnston. Adenocarcinoma on Cervical Cytology Management of Abnormal Cervical Cytology and CIN in Pregnancy Glossary References Acknowledgements Disclaimer: This guideline serves as a guide to clinician and may not cover every clinical scenario.

Management should be individualised and tailored to each patient’s condition and wishes. Hakama M, Räsänen-Virtanen U. Effect of a mass screening program on the risk of cervical cancer. Am J Epidemiol. May; (5)– Johannesson G, Geirsson G, Day N. The effect of mass screening in Iceland,on the incidence and mortality of cervical carcinoma.

Int J Cancer. Apr 15; 21 (4)– Colposcopy with endocervica l sampling is required for assessment of atypical glandular cells. An endometrial biopsy is preferred for assessment of all women over the age of 35, women with abnormal vaginal bleeding, and women with other risk factors for endometrial Size: KB.

The study had long follow‐up—an average of years per woman and a maximum of 10 years, and more than 70% of the women had three or more negative smears.

We excluded the time and any smears after the first abnormal smear as these smears were more likely to be taken as part of subsequent clinical management rather than for screening by: 2. consensus guidelines for management of abnormal cervical cytology and histology. The guidelines include rec- ommendations for special populations (i.e., adolescents and pregnant women).

In general, patient management depends upon the degree of abnormality found and the patient’s history and age and is often influenced by HPV test results. SUBJECTIVE May include: 1.

No symptoms. Vaginal discharge 3. Vaginal bleeding or spotting. History of abnormal cervical cytology test. OBJECTIV E May include: Normal pelvic Size: KB. Abnormal smear A smear which shows cells which are not typically normal or where pre-cancerous or cancerous cells are identified.

Adequate smear A specimen which is deemed satisfactory for evaluation by the laboratory. Biopsy Removal of a sample of tissue from the body for examination under a microscope. Cervical cancer Cancer of the cervix. To evaluate preferences among ethnically diverse women for the management of a low-grade abnormal Pap smear result: early colposcopy or observation with repeat Pap smears.

A series of abnormal cervical smears and 42 cases of carcinoma in situ of the cervix during pregnancy is presented. Multiple biopsies were performed on all the patients with abnormal smears, and, additionally, conizations were done when the biopsy yielded carcinoma in by: with abnormal cervical cytology from to found that the overall rate of inadequate follow-up for abnormal Pap tests was approximately 38%2.

This patient population indicated significant associations between inadequate abnormal Pap follow up and several risk factors, including lack of insurance or having public insurance and younger File Size: KB. 6 MANAGEMENT OF ABNORMAL CERVICAL CYTOLOGY Criteria for referral for colposcopy The decision to refer for colposcopy depends on the likelihood that a patient has CIN II/III or more advanced disease.

The following table is a guide to this decision. Cervical Cytology Significance Suggested actions Normal (+ inflammation) % CIN II-IIIFile Size: KB. If CIN, but no glandular neoplasia, is identified histologically during the initial workup of a woman with atypical endocervical, endometrial, or glandular cells NOS, management should be according to the Consensus Guidelines for the Management of Women with Cervical Intraepithelial by: Recommendations are made for the management of patients with abnormal cervical smears.

Colposcopic examination is indicated for persistent mild and moderate dyskaryosis, as well as for severe by:   However, the epidemiologic data are convincing.

In nations that have adopted cytologic screening programs, the incidence and mortality from cervical cancer has declined dramatically []. Because of its success in cervical cancer prevention, the Pap smear has come to be known as the archetype of screening tests. Although it had a profound effect on cervical cancer morbidity and mortality in an era of highly prevalent cervical disease Cited by: This was endorsed as the preferred management option for the Bethesda category re‐named as ASC‐US, under the category of Atypical squamous cells (ASC) in 10 Additional assessment of the ALTS database resulted in numerous publications, which have provided a great deal of information related to cervical cancer, including the Cited by: the ASCCP guidelines for the management of abnormal cervical cancer screening tests (6) and CIN or AIS (7) remain valid, with the exception of the spe-cific areas reviewed.

Those earlier guidelines have been combined with current revisions in this document to provide comprehensive recommendations for manage-ment.

Changes are summarized in File Size: 1MB. Abnormal Cervical Smear - case Study And Management A year-old woman attends the colposcopy clinic after an abnormal smear test. She is very anxious as she thinks that she might have cervical cancer. The smear is reported as ‘severe dyskaryosis’.

She had a previous normal result at age 25 years. Background: Process-mapping of the patient pathway at the Birmingham Women’s Hospital revealed that, after an abnormal smear was identified, women could experience a significant delay before referral for treatment.

The direct referral policy was introduced in as part of a wider pan-Birmingham project to address this. Aim: To investigate the impact of the direct referral policy on. The outcome was assessed for all women in Nottingham who had a first report of abnormal cervical cytology in Satisfactory follow up could be found for only (59%) of them.

For (26%) one subsequent normal smear had been reported but no further follow up requested. For 43 (4%), no subsequent test, after the abnormal smear, had been requested by the patient's general Cited by: Screening to Prevent Cervical Cancer: Guidelines for the Management of Women with Screen Detected Abnormalities were developed by an expert group convened by the NHMRC.

They were endorsed by the NHMRC in December and published in The guidelines were based on the latest available literature at that time and provided.